"Madame, bear in mind That princes govern all things--save the wind." -Victor Hugo, The Infanta's Rose

Monday, May 05, 2008

Necesito un alka-seltzer, por favor

We're back! Happy Cinco de Mayo from Wind In The Wire.

We've timed our glorious return to the Blog Space in honor of this auspicious occasion. Now, I realize that some people may possibly confuse Cinco de Mayo with a similar ethnic holiday also celebrated in the spring, St. Patrick's Day, but we are here to set the record straight once and for all: St. Patty's Day is generally observed on March 17th, and involves a great deal of celebration and partying by getting totally drunk out of your mind on Guinness Stout, while in comparison, Cinco De Mayo is observed on May 5th (generally speaking) and involves a great deal of celebration and partying by getting totally drunk out of your mind on Jose Cuervo Tequila. This is an important distinction.

But seriously, today is a very important day in Mexican history, as it commemorates the historically significant birthday of, day of independence, er, I mean Battle of Hastings, New Orleans, The Bulge, um, well actually, I'm not sure; maybe one of these folks knows what Cinco de Mayo marks:



Ha ha! We're just kidding! Of course any fool knows that Cinco De Mayo is primarily a regional and not an obligatory federal holiday which marks the initial victory of Mexican forces led by General Ignacio Zaragoza Seguín over French forces in the Battle of Puebla on May 5, 1862, a date observed in the United States and other locations around the world as a celebration of Mexican heritage and pride. Furthermore, any flea-brain yahoo will tell you that a common misconception in the United States is that Cinco de Mayo is Mexico's Independence Day; Mexico's Independence Day is actually September 16 (i.e., dieciséis de septiembre), which is the most important national patriotic holiday in Mexico.

And naturally, it goes without saying (as any five-year old kindergarten student is well aware), that although the Mexican army was victorious over the French at Puebla, the victory only delayed the French invasion of Mexico City, and the French occupied Mexico a year later, during which time French occupying forces placed Maximilian I, Emperor of Mexico, on the throne, but the French were eventually defeated and expelled in 1867, and Maximilian was executed by President Benito Juarez five years after the Battle of Puebla.

I mean, who doesn't know that?? C'mon!

So in the spirit of this day marking the defeat of French forces by the Mexican Army, this blog sternly advises you to step away from that croissant and glass of wine, Francois, and have some chips, salsa, a big ol' burrito and some cerveza instead. But when you wake up tomorrow morning and face the prospect of going to work with a God-awful hangover after a night of partying, eating, dancing and drinking, just don't refer to today as "Sicko De Mayo".

Arriba!

1 Comments:

  • At 5/07/2008 01:04:00 PM, Blogger Chandira said…

    These holidays are never celebrated in any capacity whatsoever to do with the original reason. I mean, St Patrick wasn't really a total piss-artist, and wasn't even Irish, but never mind that.
    Tequila is evil.
    WHich is why I love it. I tired some coffee flavour stuff a while back, which was even more evil, as it was easier to drink!
    I have a workmate who is also a Brit, so we celebrated St George's Day, but in an English way, I made scones, he made a Victoria Sandwich, and we drank orange squash and it was all very civilized, really.
    We couldn't in all honesty usually give a crap about St George when we were in England though.. He was a religious zealot who massacred a bunch of innocent pagans. I'm not into that.

     

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